Analysis of Production Cost Variances: Explained

Advertisement

In the field of cost accounting, variance analysis of production costs is an essential tool for evaluating and controlling direct and indirect costs within an organization.

This method helps identify differences between actual and budgeted costs, offering a detailed understanding of financial performance and areas needing improvement.

In this blog, we will delve into the process of analyzing production cost variances, using concrete examples to illustrate each step.

Read Also: Production Cost Techniques: Meeting Information Needs in Accounting

Understanding Production Cost Variances

Before diving into the calculations and analysis, it is important to understand the nature of production cost variances. These variances represent the differences between actual costs incurred and budgeted or standard costs for production.

These variances can arise due to variations in quantities used, unit costs, or activity levels. The analysis of production cost variances aims to identify and understand these variations to improve cost management and make informed decisions.

Types of Production Cost Variances

There are two main types of production cost variances: variances on direct costs and variances on indirect costs.

Read Also: 14 Best Practices for Streamlining the Budgeting Process

Variance on Direct Cost of Production

The variance on direct cost of production compares the actual or observed cost to the pre-established costs adapted to actual production. Direct costs include raw materials, direct labor, and any other expense directly linked to production. The formula to calculate this variance is as follows:

Variance on Direct Cost of Production = Actual Cost – Pre-established Cost Adapted

This variance can be broken down into two sub-variances: cost variance and quantity variance. Cost variance measures the differences in actual unit costs compared to standard costs, while quantity variance evaluates the differences between actual and budgeted quantities for actual production.

Read Also: Accounting and Ethical Conduct

Analysis of Direct Cost of Production Variance

Let’s start by analyzing the direct cost of production variance using the following data:

  • Actual cost of raw materials: €4,600
  • Standard cost of raw materials: €3.00 per unit
  • Actual quantity consumed: 4,600 kg
  • Pre-established quantity (adapted to actual production): 4,570 kg

Now, let’s calculate the cost variance and quantity variance:

Cost Variance:

Read Also: Flexible Budgeting and Analysis of Overhead Costs

Cost Variance = (Actual Unit Cost – Standard Unit Cost) x Actual Quantity

Cost Variance = (€3.10/kg – €3.00/kg) x 4,600 kg

Cost Variance = €0.10/kg x 4,600 kg = €460 (unfavorable)

Read Also: The Role of Today’s Cost and Management Accountant

In this case, the cost variance indicates that the actual purchasing conditions of raw materials were less favorable than expected, resulting in an additional cost of €460.

Quantity Variance:

Quantity Variance = (Actual Quantity – Pre-established Quantity) x Standard Unit Cost

Quantity Variance = (4,600 kg – 4,570 kg) x €3.00/kg

Quantity Variance = 30 kg x €3.00/kg = €90 (unfavorable)

The quantity variance suggests that for actual production, a standard consumption of 4,570 kg was planned, but the company actually consumed 4,600 kg, leading to an unfavorable overconsumption.

Verification:

Total Direct Cost of Production Variance = Cost Variance + Quantity Variance

= €460 + €90 = €550 (unfavorable)

Variance on Indirect Cost of Production

The variance on indirect cost of production compares the actual indirect costs to the budgeted or standard costs for a specific activity level. Indirect costs are expenses not directly linked to production, such as overhead, utilities, and maintenance costs. The formula to calculate this variance is as follows:

Variance on Indirect Cost of Production = Actual Costs – (Standard Variable Cost x Actual Activity) – Standard Fixed Cost

This variance can also be broken down into three sub-variances: budget variance, activity variance, and efficiency variance. These sub-variances help identify the impact of variations in variable costs, activity, and efficiency on actual costs.

Analysis of Indirect Cost of Production Variance

Let’s analyze the indirect cost of production variance using the following data:

  • Actual variable expenses: €7,000
  • Actual fixed expenses: €2,940
  • Actual activity: 1,060 hours
  • Normal activity: 980 hours
  • Standard variable cost: €7.00 per hour
  • Standard fixed cost: €2.94 per hour

Now, let’s calculate the three sub-variances: budget variance, activity variance, and efficiency variance.

Budget Variance:

Budget Variance = Actual Expenses – Flexible Budget (actual activity)

Budget Variance = (Actual Variable Expenses + Actual Fixed Expenses) – [(Standard Variable Cost x Actual Activity) + Standard Fixed Cost]

Budget Variance = (€7,000 + €2,940) – [(€7.00/hour x 1,060 hours) + €2,940]

Budget Variance = €9,940 – €9,800 = €140 (unfavorable)

Activity Variance:

Activity Variance = Flexible Budget (actual activity) – Standard Budget (actual activity)

Activity Variance = [(Standard Variable Cost + Standard Fixed Cost) x Actual Activity] – [(Standard Variable Cost + Standard Fixed Cost) x Normal Activity]

Activity Variance = [(€7.00/hour + €2.94/hour) x 1,060 hours] – [(€7.00/hour + €2.94/hour) x 980 hours]

Activity Variance = (€9.94/hour x 1,060 hours) – (€9.94/hour x 980 hours) = €240 (favorable)

Efficiency Variance:

Efficiency Variance = Standard Budget (actual activity) – Standard Budget (pre-established activity)

Efficiency Variance = [(Standard Variable Cost + Standard Fixed Cost) x Actual Activity] – [(Standard Variable Cost + Standard Fixed Cost) x Pre-established Activity]

Efficiency Variance = [(€7.00/hour + €2.94/hour) x 1,060 hours] – [(€7.00/hour + €2.94/hour) x 1,040 hours]

Efficiency Variance = (€9.94/hour x 1,060 hours) – (€9.94/hour x 1,040 hours) = €200 (favorable)

Verification:

Total Indirect Cost of Production Variance = Budget Variance + Activity Variance + Efficiency Variance

= €140 + €240 + €200 = €580 (favorable)

Analysis of Production Cost Variances

In the examples above, unfavorable variances indicate higher actual costs than expected, while favorable variances suggest lower actual costs than forecasted. These variances provide valuable information for decision-making and process improvement.

For example, the unfavorable variance on direct cost of production indicates that the company paid more for raw materials than expected. This could be due to price increases, lower quality, or supply issues.

The unfavorable budget variance on indirect costs suggests that actual variable costs were higher than expected, which could be due to inefficient use of resources or overconsumption.

On the other hand, favorable variances can indicate savings or efficiency gains. For example, the favorable activity variance on indirect costs indicates that the company benefited from a lower allocation of fixed costs due to a higher-than-expected activity level. The favorable efficiency variance suggests improved productivity, resulting in lower unit costs.

Conclusion

The analysis of production cost variances is a powerful tool for evaluating financial performance and identifying areas needing improvement. By breaking down variances into sub-variances, managers can obtain detailed insights into cost and activity variations.

These insights can then be used to optimize processes, negotiate better rates, improve production efficiency, and make informed strategic decisions.

It is important to note that the analysis of production cost variances is a continuous process that requires regular monitoring and evaluation. Variances can occur due to changes in the economic environment, raw material prices, labor efficiency, or other factors.

Regular analysis allows companies to quickly identify problems and take corrective actions, ensuring effective cost management and continuous improvement in financial performance.

FAQ

What are the main types of production cost variances?

There are two main types of production cost variances: variances on direct costs and variances on indirect costs. Variances on direct costs compare actual costs of raw materials, direct labor, and other direct expenses to budgeted costs. Variances on indirect costs analyze the differences between actual and budgeted costs of indirect expenses, such as overhead and utilities.

Within these two categories, variances are broken down into sub-variances to specifically identify variations in costs, quantities, and activity.

How does the analysis of production cost variances help improve performance?

The analysis of production cost variances provides valuable information that helps companies identify areas needing improvement. For example, an unfavorable cost variance may indicate that the actual costs of raw materials are higher than expected, prompting the company to renegotiate prices with suppliers or seek more economical sources.

Additionally, the analysis of activity and efficiency variances can reveal inefficiencies in production processes or opportunities for productivity improvement. Companies can use this information to optimize their operations and enhance overall performance.

How does the analysis of production cost variances integrate with the overall budgeting process?

The analysis of production cost variances is a crucial element of the budgeting and budgetary control process. Initial budgets are established based on cost and activity forecasts. Variance analysis allows for the comparison of actual results to forecasts and the identification of variances.

These variances provide valuable information for adjusting future budgets, improving forecast accuracy, and making short-term and long-term strategic decisions. It is a dynamic tool that evolves with the company and helps it adapt to market and economic environment changes.

What are the limitations of production cost variance analysis?

Despite its usefulness, the analysis of production cost variances has some limitations.

First, variances may sometimes be the result of external factors beyond the company’s control, such as price changes or market conditions. These factors may complicate the interpretation of variances and the identification of their true causes.

Additionally, variance analysis relies on budgeted and standard costs, which may sometimes be based on inaccurate or outdated data. If initial forecasts are not accurate, variance analysis may yield misleading results.

Finally, variance analysis does not always take into account qualitative factors such as product quality, customer satisfaction, or sustainability. It is important to consider these factors in addition to financial performance to obtain a comprehensive view of the company’s success.

Regular analysis allows companies to quickly identify problems and take corrective actions, ensuring effective cost management and continuous improvement in financial performance.

Advertisement
Previous articleStrategy : definitions and vocabulary
Next articleThe Power of AI in HR Talent Acquisition

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here